DOES YOUR HAIR HAVE THE 7 YEAR ITCH? Seen Daily Mail

If you’ve ever run your fingers through your hair and felt as though it seems different to how it did when you were a child or a teenager, you’re not alone.

In fact, you might just be on a new and different hair cycle.

Trichologists and hairdressers alike have long agreed that hair growth is broken down into cycles, which roughly last between four and seven years.

FEMAIL spoke with celebrity hairdresser, Anthony Nader of RAW Hair, to find out how you can identify what stage of the cycle your locks are in – and make it best work for you.

Speaking to Daily Mail Australia, Anthony explained that the seven year hair cycle is based on the cycle of hair growth, which takes place in three stages.

‘The first phase – where the hair is growing quickly, the second phase – where the growth of the hair slows, and the third phase – where the hair is stagnant and just doesn’t grow,’ Anthony said.

‘The best way to identify the various stages of the cycle is to acknowledge whether your hair is growing at its fastest rate ever, which illustrates stage one, whether it’s growing but slowly, which depicts stage two, or whether your hair is actively shedding, which is stage three.

‘If you find that the texture of your hair is changing, you are most likely in the first phase of growth, as it’s not uncommon for your locks to grow back differently to the way they were before.’

While it might surprise you that your hair can change entirely within seven years, in fact Anthony said it’s perfectly normal – with the ‘old being replaced by fresh, new growth’.

So how can you look after your hair to best make the most of your cycle?

First up, look to your diet.

‘Ensure you are getting enough iron and protein from your food, but if you’re lacking in anything – and even if you’re not – keep on top of those mutlivitamins,’ Anthony said – as these will help to maintain strong, healthy locks and minimise breakage.

‘Next, brush your hair twice a day – in the morning and in the night – with a 100 per cent boar bristle brush.

‘Massage the scalp when you do this, as this acts as a bit of a wake-up call for your follicles, brushing away any loose strands near the end of their cycle and stimulating blood flow.’

Lastly, the expert said it’s a good idea to ‘avoid stressing your tresses’.

‘Stress is detrimental to so many aspects of your health, but you can see a real difference in the strength and well-being of your hair when you avoid this.

‘Remember, when you colour your hair not to go more than two shades lighter than your natural base, as this will cause stress on the strands and can make them look dry and lacklustre’

The only kind of stress that is good for your locks is exercise stress, which ‘gets the blood bumping and does great things for your strands’.

‘And also it’s important to know that everyone is different,’ Anthony concluded.

‘If you find something that works for you and your hair, stick with it.’