THREE COMMON MISTAKES YOUR MAKING WITH YOUR COLOURED BLONDE HAIR. Seen Beauty Crew

The common mistakes artificial blondes tend to make

The common mistakes artificial blondes tend to make.

Having coloured blonde hair may be incredibly pretty (just look to Charlize Theron and Selena Gomez for some major swoon-worthy inspo), but it’s also extremely easy to muck up the integrity of the colour, not to mention the health of your hair. To make sure your hair remains the beautiful blonde hair you signed up for, take note. Here, hairstylist Anthony Nader shares the three most common mistakes blondes make, plus how to correct them.

Mistake #1 / You’re not getting a haircut often enough

Those with bottled blonde hair are more susceptible to dryness and damage due to the intense processing techniques their hair goes through to become blonde. “Blondes need a little bit more loving because each hair strand is plumped up with bleach and peroxide, and maybe even heat to process,” explains Nader. “This is why venturing over to the lighter spectrum does require more upkeep and a commitment to keeping your hair hydrated and healthy.” To ensure your blonde hair continues to look fresh, Nader suggests the following: “I recommend [a haircut] every six to seven weeks religiously. Also, add a few layers throughout the interior of your cut to add lift and energy to your hairstyle so it won’t sit flat.”

Mistake #2 / You’re not preserving your colourists’ hard work

Being an artificial blonde isn’t easy – you’re likely to spend up to three or four hours in the salon to get your colour done, not to mention the money that you’re spending on the appointment itself. “The colour process when you go blonde can take its toll, especially if your natural base is between a level 5 (medium brown) to level 10 (black),” explains Nader. “Basically, the rule is: the darker the natural shade, the more susceptible your strands will be to becoming fragile and split because the colourist will need to use a higher strength peroxide to get the target blonde shade required. The lighter your natural base, the easier it is to get that beautiful clean Scandinavian blonde that we (yes, that’s me included) die for.”

To preserve your colour between appointments, look for purple-toned hair products to reverse orange tones that may appear over time. “I love these pigmented shampoos to fight off brassy tones,” says Nader, “Use [one] once a week to treat your hair, or up to twice a week to maintain cool tones”. We like John Frieda Sheer Blonde Colour Renew Shampoo (our Review Crew® awarded it four stars!), EVO Fabuloso Platinum Blonde Colour Intensifying Conditioner (fine hair will love its lightweight formula), and Davines Alchemic Silver Conditioner as it’s super nourishing and loaded with jojoba to protect coloured hair.

Mistake #3 / You’re asking for the wrong kind of colour application

With so many hair colour application techniques like balayage, scalp bleaching, hair contouring and 4D hair colouring available to try, how do you pick the right one for you? Nader says you should make your choice according to how much maintenance you’re willing to put in, and how regularly you’re able to visit a salon for a colour refresh. For Nader, he has a clear favourite. “Balayage is the no brainer for the low-maintenance woman who wants to look fashion-forward and effortless. I always suggest keeping the lightness around your face (hairline) rather than having the colour applied too far down the hair shaft. So, add lightness around two to three inches from the roots rather than five to six inches. If your balayage is too far down the hair length, it can look like you haven’t had your hair coloured for nine months and your roots instantly appear dirty and dark.”