Tag Archives: raw

WHO’S YOUR CELEB GO-TO HAIR CUT & COLOUR FOR 2020? Seen Harpers bazaar

The 15 Hairstyles You’ll See Everywhere In Summer 2020

If you’ve been flirting with the idea of changing your hairstyle, now is the perfect time to switch it up.
After all, a new season is fast approaching, fresh looks are emerging and inspiration is abundant.
In order to provide you with some guidance amid the onslaught of options, we consulted some of Australia’s leading hairdressers to get their expert takes on the trending cuts, colours and styles for summer 2020.
So, if you fancy a new ‘do, keep scrolling for (and prepare to screenshot) the ‘it’-looks of the coming season.

WHATS YOUR GO TO CURLING HAIR TOOL? Seen WHIMN

The whimn Team On….Our Go-To Hair Curling Tool

Curls are a gift and a curse. If you don’t have them, you’re desperate for them. You subject your strands to extraordinary heat – tugging, pulling and twisting until you form something you’re satisfied with. Only for them to straighten out after an hour.

If you’re born with them, you probably roll your eyes at all the women who yearn for curls, as you sit there with three hairbrushes knotted in there, stuck since 2001. Curls are a complex thing, but my lord are they gorgeous.

Coordinating curls can be quite the challenge, so to help you get the result you’re after, here are the curling tool recommendations of seven millennial women with very different hair types.

Melissa, Editor

I’m anything but a pro in the hair styling department, so curling irons are one of the hardest-to-master beauty tools for me. That’s until I came across the foolproof ALDI Visage curling iron, a special buy last year for $19. I repeat, $19. I’ve got fine, naturally straight hair cut into a lob, so need a thin wand. Portioning my hair, it takes me about 20 minutes to do my entire head wrapping it around the curling iron barrel – which is just about the level of patience I have and what I’ve found to be the easiest tool. What’s even better is, once done, the style will last a couple of days, going from my version of Hollywood waves to serious bedhead vibes.

Ashleigh, Beauty Editor

I already have naturally thick and wavy hair when its air dried, but to get it to give good curl, I need to help it along a little.

My hairdresser, the absolute strand maestro Anthony Nader, taught me a trick that I’ve used ever since. When my hair is wet, I scrunch through a good dollop of Oribe Matte Waves Texture Lotion (which leaves you with salt-spray waves, sans dryness) before hitting it with the Dyson Supersonic diffuser attachment. The diffuser works to simulate natural drying, with the added benefit of reducing frizz and defining my waves into actual curls. If I really want va-va-voom volume, I tip my head upside down as I move the dryer around my head – does the trick every time.

Bek, Commissioning Editor

My name is Bek Day and my hair is kinkier than I am. Phew. It feels good to say it. A by-product of having kinky, unruly hair is that it’s really more frizz than curl when left to its own devices, which means I’m constantly either straightening or curling the bastard to get it to choose a side. For curling, I can’t go past the Muk Curling Stick. It comes with three different size attachments – for loose waves I use the really fat one and then texturise with sea salt spray, and for more glam I go the medium setting, pin up after I’ve curled and then brush out for maximum impact. It’s easy enough that even ole butterfingers me has only received a handful of second-degree burns. A small price to pay.

Stefanie, Social Media Editor

As a gal with naturally very straight hair, I like a bit of movement when it comes to my locks. While my hair doesn’t hold a strong curl (sorry any and all wedding-related updos), it sure does love a good wave.

I was gifted a ghd by my hairdresser on my 30th birthday, and girlfriends, I haven’t looked back. It’s the easiest (and quickest) way for my hair to get that volume going, and I am now proficient in doing both sides (you have to learn to turn your wrist the opposite way)!

I use the original ghd IV, which is also excellent at taming my pain-in-the-ass fringe after a tumultuous night’s sleep. Can’t live without.

Abbey, Reporter

I was that kid in primary school. The one huffing down bread crust and sleeping in rollers. I have wanted curly hair since before I can remember. Alas, the universe had other plans for me. I have very thick, very straight, very frizzy hair. This means that when left to its own devices, I look like Mufasa. This also means that with a curling wand and a bit of technique, I look like Farrah Fawcett.

Dead and dry strands aren’t good for much, but oh boy do they hold a voluminous curl. Like Bek, I also use the MUK Curl Stick. I opt only for the widest barrel, it’s the only curler I find takes really well to thick hair, and it’s super easy to manoeuvre. I love it so much that once it stopped working after four years of almost daily use, I bought it again.

Edwina, News Editor

To the capable, world-beating women who can curl their hair with a straightener, I salute you. Me? After years of futile attempts, I fell back in love with the reliable, effective curling wand. I’ve tried a bunch over the years and I’m not loyal, nor fussed, about what brand I use – as long as it delivers loose waves that have staying power (easy when you’ve bleached your hair into oblivion) then I’m happy. At the moment I’ve been using the Models Prefer Professional Style Curler that’s $19.95 and available at Priceline. Yes, it’s cheap-cheap but it’s got a 4.4 / 5 star rating because it’s good.

Courtney, Entertainment Reporter

I used to use my GHD straightener to curl my hair for the longest time but when I started bleaching it two years ago it was too hard on my hair so I swapped to a Babyliss Pro (which I chose purely because it’s what my hairdresser uses on me when I’m in). I can adjust the heat so it’s not too intense, it’s the perfect barrel size and incredibly easy to use!

Who’s your celebrity crush Spring inspiration hair colour? Seen Harper’s Bazaar

The 5 Hair Colour Trends You’re Going To See Everywhere This Spring

There’s arguably nothing more transformative than a new hairstyle. And while haircuts do certainly provide you with a healthy revamp, there’s something about a fresh colour that takes everything to the next level.
That being said, there’s never really a better time to elevate your colour than at the start of spring. After all, the weather starts warming up, and the desire to lighten one’s locks to match the brighter days beckons.
And if you’ve been looking for your next colour change but aren’t sure where to start, fear not, for we consulted three experts to uncover the five ‘It’ hair colour trends we’ll be seeing everywhere this spring.
From “colour contouring” to “tutti frutti tones”, keep scrolling to find the right hue for you.

Why should you drop Ombré hair colour for Sombre Hair colour? Anthony dishes up the clarity between the two colour techniques. Seen ELLE

Why You Should Definitely Ditch Your Ombré Hair For ‘Sombré’ Hair

While ombre has been having a serious moment for some years now, it’s high time you ditch that stark contrast for something a little softer.

We’re talking about the ‘sombré’ — ombre’s much cuter, and much more natural, protégé. We may be stating the obvious here, but sombré literally translates to ‘soft ombré’. Think super blended colours, subtle shade graduation and a lived-in look. It’s the perfect middle-ground between the piece-y and dimensional balayage, and the often contrasting dual tones that came with previous ombré techniques.

So, how do you nail a sombré hair colour? “The sombré method involves taking weaving your natural root colour, found at the very base of your strands (also known as the root stretch method) delicately through the lengths of your mane, to create a gradual transition of colour between roots to ends,” explains leading Sydney hairstylist Anthony Nader of Raw Salon.
“Another way hairdressers can address this sombré trend is when we apply what’s referred to as ‘low lights’ to the already existing “high lights”. It’s ALL about that #sombreblend.”

The Best Sombré Hair Inspiration To Take To Your Next Appointment

If you’re after an obvious colour transformation—minus the pesky upkeep—then the sombre is definitely for you. Being that your natural hair colour is maintained on the roots, and the shades used on your ends are close to your hair’s original tones, you can let this baby grow out for months before having to visit your colourist again.
A little unsure of what to ask your colourist for when getting a sombre? Make it clear that you want to stay within the general tone family of your natural hair colour by using tones that are a few shades lighter and a few shades darker than your actual base colour for a breezy, natural finish.
Here, we round up a TONNE of sombre hair colour inspo to take to your next appointment. Scroll on to see it all.

WHOS THINKING A POST BABY OR POST BREAKUP HAIRCUT? Get Anthony’s positive steps forward seen GRITTY PRETTY.

Getting The Chop: The Psychology Behind A Dramatic Hair Cut

Posted in Hair, Lifestyle on August 1, 2019 by


“I wanted to make a statement,” says Stevie Ford of Top Shelf Beauté. “[He] was my high school sweetheart. The first break up, I cut my hair really short and the second time we broke up, I dyed my strawberry blonde hair a dark brown.”Ford isn’t the first person to dramatically change their appearance in the wake of a painful relationship breakdown. Far from it. The post-breakup hair cut is almost a rite of passage.

But this phenomenon isn’t exclusive to just breakups. For Talisa Sutton, founder of Badlands Studio, it was the birth of her daughter that inspired a whole new look. “I spent my whole pregnancy growing out my hair, and while I loved the length, once Lúa was born, I felt like it was time for a change,” Sutton tells Gritty Pretty. “A chop signified the beginning of a wonderful new chapter – and there is less for her to pull on now!”

So, why do women (and some men) feel compelled to chop off their hair following a significant life event?

According to Tara Hurster, psychologist and founder of The TARA Clinic in Sydney’s Bondi Junction, it’s normal to change our appearance as we grow. “When we are experiencing a lot of change in our life, changing our appearance can be a way of having something you can control amongst all the things outside your control.”

For new mothers, “Beyond the potential practical aspects of short hair being easier to handle, birth can be a powerful experience and some women may see themselves differently after experiencing such an impactful event,” says Hurster. “This may lead them to want to have their external appearance showcase how they see themselves internally.”

The good news? When done right, a new hair cut can boost self-esteem. “When we receive compliments or attention from others it can help to lift our confidence,” Hurster adds. “A new hairstyle can definitely leave people feeling powerful, strong, sexy and proud.”

Anthony Nader, founder of Sydney’s RAW Anthony Nader, has seen it all. “My salon team has definitely had some of these ‘post’ [i.e. post-breakup, post-baby] examples sitting in their chairs over time, that’s for sure,” Nader says. “We all know the signs to look and listen out for when these times arise.”

His advice? “Go to a stylist that you can trust first and foremost, and one that knows you and your lifestyle best. There could be a number of factors that you may not have considered. Does [the new style] require blow drying every day, and have you got the time for this? You may want the same full head of foils as your girlfriend, but is this colour going to work with your skin complexion?”

Before you sit down in the hairdresser’s chair and mutter those three magic words – “chop it off” – give yourself a few days to mull it over, first. “With regards to a breakup, wanting a fresh start or new look can help with the grieving process and give you permission to see yourself differently,” says Hurster. “I would encourage you to sleep on the decision for a few days to ensure that it is your internal voice talking, rather than rash emotions.”

According to Hurster, it’s important to take a moment and consider the purpose of the change. Is it to get back at someone? Is it an attempt to please someone else? Or, is the new ‘do an exciting change? If the answer is the latter, Hurster says, “Go for it!”.

They say a change is as good as a holiday; a mini makeover gives hairdressers a chance to be creative and explore on-trend hair cuts and colours. However, communication is key, explains Nader: “You and your stylist need to break down the consultation so there is absolute clarity on both sides before the tools get picked up.”

Suffering from a case of post-chop regret? Keep calm and remember: hair grows back. You have two options here. Option one: book another appointment with a reputable stylist to discuss your options. Or, as Hurster suggests, “Embrace your new look and run with it! The way to do this is stand tall, hold your head high and lean into this new you with confidence and poise.”

BE CAREFUL THAT YOUR NEW BANGS DONT MAKE YOU LOOK LIKE YOUR BACK IN KINDERGARTEN. Anthony gives his top advice when taking the plunge. Seen ELLE.

The Top 4 Fringe Trends To Try This Winter

While the thought of winter tends to inspire more ‘curling up’ than ‘dressing up’, it’s actually the perfect time to experiment with your look, especially when it comes to trialling a fringe.
After all, with summer comes humidity, leaving our locks limp or frizzy. Our efforts with the straightener end up moot, and all we want to do is get our hair off our face and sweat-drenched neck. On the other hand, the colder season actually gives your fringe a fighting chance and lets you see whether you truly like the look. And luckily for us, this season’s crop of fringes are well worth trying.
In order to find out how to style the fringes leading the way in winter 2019, we consulted leading Sydney hairstylist Anthony Nader of Raw Salon.

1. THE MID-LENGTH ‘BLUNT’ FRINGE

The blunt fringe has always been one of the more dramatic styles but this season’s leading style offers a slightly softer mid-length finish.
“I tend to keep the edges of the fringe curved a little lower rather than perfectly horizontal all the way across, as this frames the face beautifully rather than a hard edge, which tends to make the forehead look disconnected from the rest of the face,” says Nader.
“For those of you with petite faces and sharp features, be sure not to take the fringe too blunt, as this is only going to make your features look more angular and harsh.”

2. THE MICRO FRINGE

A tough look to wear and not for the faint of heart, Nader emphasises that this look is best suited to those with oval face shapes.
“I wouldn’t cut the the micro fringe or on face shapes that are too small and round, as this is only going to emphasise the roundness of your face more,” he explains.
“Longer face shapes suit this cut much more. What I tend to do is make the edge of the baby fringe a touch longer on the corners when cutting, as this adds more shape to the face – the ideal shape to attain is oval.”
To give this look a more effortless finish, Nader recommends having your hairdresser cut your micro fringe with a razor.
“This adds more softness and it’s a little bit more fashion-forward, rather than cutting with scissors which can leave a harsher, solid line,” he says.

3. THE CURLY FRINGE

While old school thinking used to discourage those with curls from cutting a fringe because it was thought to mean constant styling, that is no longer the case in 2019. In fact, all that matters now when it comes to achieving this stylishly dishevelled look is how your hairdresser cuts it, Nader explains.
“Personally when I’m cutting a curly fringe, I always cut it DRY. [The ] reason being is that if you cut it wet, you’re always going to underestimate how much it will jump up when it dries. In this case, the fringe will end up a lot shorter than you anticipated—and you may end up looking like you’re off to kindergarten,” Nader tells ELLE.
The key to working a curly fringe on the daily without all the fuss? Nailing the length.
“I’d lean more toward keeping a curly fringe on the longer side in length. [This] tends to lend itself more to a sensual, carefree vibe and it really doesn’t look like it’s just freshly cut. Keep it overgrown and tousled, just below the brows,” says Nader.

4. THE CURTAIN FRINGE

A classic look popularised by French film icon Brigitte Bardot, the curtain fringe is one of the most versatile styles out there. It can be parted in the middle or swept to the side, and depending on preference, can skew shorter towards the centre and longer as it moves further out along the hairline, or kept all fairly similar in length.
“I still think that the curtain fringe is the number one look I am asked for, simply because you see a lot of celebrities with various lengths of a curtain fringe, effortlessly styled to look super cool but sexy at the same time,” says Nader.
“The thing that I love about the curtain fringe is that when it’s cut right, it automatically looks worn-in and soft. [This is] because, when playing with fringes, there’s a very fine line in the way that it’s cut, where it can either look French-girl-chic or unfortunately as though you you’ve cut your hair in the bathroom with a pair of blunt scissors.”
A great look to trial in winter and take into summer, this fringe looks relaxed and elegant even as it grows out. And the best part about it? It suits everyone.
“Another thing I love about the curtain fringe is that its suitable for literally every face shape, depending how the hairdresser lines up the shape of the ‘curtain’, so to speak,” says Nader.

DID BELLA HADID REALLY SPORT HER NEW LOOK THIS WEEK AT MARC JACOBS & CHAR DEFRANCESCO’S WEDDING IN NEW YORK? Anthony dishes up the how-to seen New Idea magazine.

Bella Hadid has had her super long, brunette locks chopped (we think) and is now sporting a very retro-style fringe.

The 22-year-old Victoria’s Secret model has been snapped with feathery bangs framing her face and she looks completely different.

 

Bella’s new style is a testament to just how much a fringe can switch things up.

Her 70’s-inspired baby-soft bangs were debuted at the weekend wedding of fashion designer Marc Jacobs and there’s no doubting that he would have fully approved. We are talking a seriously on-trend hair style here.

 

 

Bella’s fringe made her look like a legitimate (and very, very pretty) member of Charlie’s Angels.

There’s no question whether it suited her or not – it most certainly did!

The only thing we were left wondering is whether this was a real fringe cut into her luxuriously, long locks, or a clip-in set of some kind. Faux or natural? Who’s to say. What we can confirm is it looked beautiful on her – and that she looked 100 per cent brand new.

 

 

That comes as no surprise to award-winning stylist Anthony Nader, of RAW Hair,

“It surprises people all the time but the fact is a fringe can make a huge difference in how you look,” says Anthony.

They’re also other benefits to bangs. For example, they do work incredibly well as camouflage for any fine lines and/ or wrinkles! Not that Bella has any of those.

Sadly though, not all hair is suited to soft, wispy tendril-style bangs like Bella’s.

 

 

Bangs cut into hair that’s coarse and/ or frizzy will not simply fall like Bella’s and instead will need to be straightened after every wash.

But hey, the results are clearly worth it.