ANTHONY NADER ON WHY STRESS IS RUINING YOUR HAIR

While it’s common knowledge that when you’re feeling frazzled, it can have a knock-on effect on your skin and body – what’s not so well known is that stress impacts our hair, too.

If you’ve been under a lot of pressure recently, you might notice that your locks look a little lacklustre or that your hair is falling out faster than usual.

Australian celebrity hairdresser, Anthony Nader – who has looked after the likes of Gisele Bundchen, Abbey Lee Kershaw and Cate Blanchett – revealed to FEMAIL how and why stress is ruining your hair.

He also explained the simple habits you can adopt to achieve glossy locks.

WHAT CONTRIBUTES TO STRESSED HAIR?

According to Anthony – who is the owner of Raw Salon in Sydney – there are many contributing factors to our stressed-out hair:

‘Poor diet is one of the major things that contributes to your hair falling out and feeling thinner,’ he told FEMAIL.

‘Of course, when you’re busy at work it can feel easy to reach for fast food or a quick bite – but this will deplete your strands of what they’re craving.’

This can also have an effect insofar as it can take months for your locks to grow a single inch.

The hairdresser also said a sudden change, whether that be switching jobs, having a baby or catching the flu, can ‘trigger hair loss’:

‘Try an appointment with a dermatologist or family doctor if you think you’re shedding more than usual,’ Anthony explained.

More than usual normally amounts to twice as much hair over a period of two weeks or more.

Finally, Anthony said that one innocent mistake many people make with stressed-out hair is they ‘pull it back into restricted hair styles like tight ponytails or braids’:

‘Try loosening up your styling and your hair and follicles will thank you,’ Anthony said.

Over-tight ponytails – often used when we have no time to wash our hair and so pull it back – can also lead to your hairline creeping higher.

HOW CAN WE DE-STRESS OUR HAIR? 

First things first with de-stressing your strands is that you have to eat well:

‘Maintaining a positive healthy diet encompassing the five food groups is key to healthy hair,’ he said.

‘Meanwhile, eating erratically will certainly show in your hair, skin and nails over time.’

Next, Anthony recommends you get more sleep:

‘We need sleep to repair our bodies and reset,’ he explained. ‘Even if it’s just an extra 15 or 30 minutes, it will make a difference.’

You can also look at vitamins and minerals or supplementation if looking to improve the state of your hair.

Anthony recommends the ABC (vitamins A, B and C):

‘Vitamin A is fabulous because it helps skin glands to make an oily substance called sebum,’ he said. ‘Sebum moisturisers help to keep your scalp and hair healthy.

‘Vitamin B also creates red blood cells, which carry oxygen and nutrients to the hair follicles.

‘Vitamin C is vital, as your body uses it to create a protein known as collagen.’

The celebrity hairdresser also recommends using a moisturising shampoo and conditioner to ‘feed your thirsty locks’.

THE MORNING AND EVENING HABITS TO ADOPT

While looking after your diet, sleep and supplementation are good all round habits to adopt to ensure a glossy mane, there are a few extra things you can do in order to have your best hair yet.

‘From today onwards, blot your wet hair rather than rubbing it,’ Anthony said. ‘Rubbing your strands dry causes breakage as each strand is delicate when wet. When you blot, your hair follicles won’t be disrupted or damaged.’

Anthony also said it’s a good idea to shower in lukewarm water, or cool the temperature down:

‘The warmer the temperature, the more drying and dehydrated each strand will become,’ he said.

‘Think of an apple that’s been in the sun and how all of the moisture will be sucked out of it to make it appear dry and brittle.

‘The same applies to hot electrical appliances too. You don’t need excessive heat to create waves – it’s unnecessary.’

Try to implement these few things into your daily hair regime and notice that your hair will feel and look thicker over time.

By Sophie Haslett, for Daily Mail Australia